Coronavirus facts – what we know so far!

Most people will get a mild infection, but the pattern is clear in the most severe cases. A World Health Organization examination of data from 56,000 patients suggests:
6% become critically ill – lung failure, septic shock, organ failure and risk of death
14% develop severe symptoms – difficulty breathing and shortness of breath
80% develop mild symptoms – fever and cough and some may have pneumonia

This information is from a massive study by the Chinese Centres of Disease Control

  1. The incubation period – between infection and showing symptoms – lasts up to 14 days. People will be most infectious when they have symptoms, but there have been suggestions some can spread the virus even before they are sick
  2. It looked at 44,000 people and showed 2.8% of infected men died, compared with 1.7% of women. And 0.2% of children and teenagers died compared with nearly 15% of people over the age of 80. The quality of the antibodies you produce when you’re 70 is a lot worse than when you’re 20. The proportion dying from the disease appears low (between 1% and 2%)
  3. “Smoking damages your lungs. This may be a particular problem in China, where estimates suggest 52% of men smoke compared with just 3% of women.
  4. There is very limited information on the symptoms of Covid-19 in children, but they appear to be mild – fever, runny nose and a cough.
  5. There have been some cases with more severe complications. Those with other health problems, such as a weakened immune system or severe asthma, will be at greater risk
  6. The number of new cases reported has fallen dramatically in recent days even as infections are surging in other countries. The World Health Organization has praised Beijing’s response.
  7. Officials reported only 99 new cases on Saturday, down from around 2,000 a day just weeks ago, and for the second day in a row, none were detected in Hubei Province outside of its capital, Wuhan, the centre of the outbreak.

Prevention

People who think they may be affected by coronavirus need to call the NHS 111 phone service for further advice. They should not go to their GP, or A&E.

  1. The best thing is regular and thorough hand washing, preferably with soap and water.
  2. Coronavirus spreads when an infected person coughs small droplets – packed with the virus – into the air. These can be breathed in, or cause an infection if you touch a surface they have landed on then your eyes, nose or mouth.
  3. So, coughing and sneezing into tissues, not touching your face with unwashed hands, and avoiding close contact with infected people are important for limiting the spread.
  4. Face masks do not provide effective protection,

Coronavirus (information from NHS)

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

COVID-19 is a new illness that can affect your lungs and airways. It’s caused by a virus called coronavirus.

What’s the risk of coronavirus in the UK?

The UK Chief Medical Officers have raised the risk to the public from low to moderate.

Health professionals are working to contact anyone who has been in close contact with people who have coronavirus.

What’s the risk of coronavirus for travellers?

There are some countries and areas where there’s a higher chance of coming into contact with someone with coronavirus.

Symptoms of coronavirus

The symptoms of coronavirus are:

a cough
a high temperature
shortness of breath

But these symptoms do not necessarily mean you have the illness.

The symptoms are similar to other illnesses that are much more common, such as cold and flu.

How coronavirus is spread

Because it’s a new illness, we do not know exactly how coronavirus spreads from person to person.

Similar viruses are spread in cough droplets.

It’s very unlikely it can be spread through things like packages or food. Viruses like coronavirus cannot live outside the body for very long.

Do I need to avoid public places?

Most people can continue to go to work, school and other public places.

You only need to stay away from public places (self-isolate) if advised to by the 111 online coronavirus service or a medical professional.

How to avoid catching or spreading germs

There are things you can do to help stop viruses like coronavirus spreading.

Do

cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze

put used tissues in the bin immediately

wash your hands with soap and water often – use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available

try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell

Bronchiolitis – This year seems to be a bad one with RSV!

We have already started to see atlleast 2-3 cases of severe Bronchiolitis every day. It is a very common respiratory illness in babies less than 1 year of age, in winter. It can be caused by several viruses, but this year, it seems to be the well associated, Respiratory Syncitial Virus coming back with a vengence. There is no treatment except supportive management with oxygen/breathing support, if needed and keeping them well hydrated with fluids.

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/bronchiolitis/

Why do babies cry excessively? https://www.bbc.co.uk/tiny-happy-people/reasons-babies-cry/z6dvhbk

All children cry. But when your child is crying excessively, and you don’t know the reason why, it can be very stressful and upsetting. Children cry for a reason, but they can’t tell you the reason they are upset, especially when they are newborn. Crying is the only way they are able to communicate a problem or a need.

There can be multiple causes for your child to be crying so much. It is usually common in children younger than 1-year-old, especially as they have no other way of telling you that something is wrong. Here are some of the reasons your baby may be crying excessively:

  1. The baby is hungry – The most common cause of an excessively crying baby is hunger. You should always make sure that you are feeding your baby a healthy amount.  Sometimes babies may not be getting enough milk, and fail to gain weight correctly. If you’re concerned about your babies weight gain, always consult your GP or paediatrician.
     
  2. The baby is too hot or cold – Babies will often cry if they are not at a comfortable temperature, or if they are wearing comfortable clothes. This can be easily solved by ensuring the room is at a comfortable temperature, or that the baby is wearing enough comfortable clothes.
     
  3. Wet or dirty nappy – it may be obvious, but a wet or dirty nappy can cause babies a lot of discomfort, causing them to cry a lot of the time. Make sure your baby always has a clean nappy, and don’t leave a dirty nappy on the baby for a long period of time.
     
  4. An indication of an illness – some of the most common causes of persistent crying in a baby is an illness. Common illnesses that affect babies include:
  • Colic – the condition that causes excessive crying in babies that are only a few weeks old, and usually stops after the baby is 4 months old. This problem usually passes, and is nothing to worry about.
  • Blocked nose
  • Ear infection
  • Urine infection
  • Gastroeosophageal Reflux Disease (GORD). This is a common condition in children in which food and stomach acid travels back up the food pipe towards the throat, causing pain in babies like heartburn. This can be avoided by regularly burping your child after feeds, and allowing the baby to sleep with its head raised to around 30 degrees. This can be done by placing 2 pillows beneath the mattress at the head end. Feed thickeners or anti-reflux medicine can also be used.
  • Some more serious but rare conditions can cause excessive crying, such as meningitis.

If you are worried about excessive crying in your child, you should see a specialist paediatrician who will be able to advise on the most appropriate course of action. If your baby is crying excessively and has fever you should see your GP as soon as possible as this may be a sign of a more serious illness.